London migration (sixteen people)

For this series both country and city ‘portraits’ were produced for each migrating ancestor. As in life, the juxtaposition of sixteen disparate people failed to present a unified image, therefore these were variously overlaid with relevant texts to create a harmonious composition.

London migration I (40cm x 40cm 15¾” x 15¾”, collagraph with collage and soluble graphite on 250 gsm Somerset Satin)

A combination of country ‘portraits’ for each of the sixteen ancestors known to have migrated into London, with their originating maps and place names. The decision to move from one’s birthplace might be prompted by dreams of success or by harsh economic necessity.

London migration II (40cm x 40cm 15¾” x 15¾”, gritblast and drypoint with soluble graphite on 250 gsm Somerset Satin)

City ‘portraits’ for each of the sixteen ancestors known to have migrated into London are combined with the street names of their first known addresses; further information is also embedded within the image.

London migration III (40cm x 40cm 15¾” x 15¾”, etching with soluble graphite on 250 gsm Somerset Satin)

Names, birthplaces and occupations have been worked into this image. As well as commenting on the difficulties of unravelling such information when tracing London-born ancestors, it underlines the need to reappraise conclusions in the light of new evidence.

London migration IV (40cm x 40cm 15¾” x 15¾”, etching with soluble graphite on 270 gsm Purcell Edition paper)

A comment on dislocation and loss of identity, and the fact that while some families go on to achieve financial success, others most definitely do not.

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~ by linesofcommunication on 1 13th March 2010.

One Response to “London migration (sixteen people)”

  1. These are really incredible! Like you mentioned regarding the conscious flaws on one of your etching plates, these seem to me to explain not only the results but the extreme difficulties, the floods of information, the false starts, and having to make sense of the fragments when one is attempting to detail her or his own family history. These are very appropriately dense in their construction, and I love how they allow you and entice you to linger on the images to unravel the information and narratives inherent.

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